Computers And Technology For Baby Boomers

January 10, 2017 | Author: | Posted in Computers and Technology

Copyright (c) 2012 David Kinghorn

As we take a look at computers and technology for baby boomers, we should remember that many baby boomers were raised on the earliest domestic computers, such as the chunky BBC models and Sinclair’s Spectrum, and those who have web access spend 50 percent more time online each day than the UK average of an hour.

But according to Age Concern almost half those over 50 still don’t own a computer, often relying on libraries and other computer centres for their internet surfing. For some there is still the psychological barrier that they are too old for technology, or computers are “not for me”.

But the mindset is changing. For instance the number of Facebook users aged 64 and older is increasing faster than any other age group. The net is a great way for people, who might otherwise find themselves isolated, to keep in touch with the rest of the world. Email and chat rooms like Gransnet, photo uploading sites such as Flickr.com, free video-conferencing through Skype and mini-blogs like Twitter, can all bring people together.

Also websites designed for older people are starting to appear such as finerday.com and thetimesofmylife.com, which allow people to share their memories – in sound, words and images.

Try the European Computer Driving License (ECDL) or Computer Literacy and Information Technology (CLAIT). Both are an easy introduction to computers and modern-day basics such as the internet, email, word processing, spreadsheets and databases.

It?s worth finding out about iPods, Skype (a system for making phone calls through your computer) and other technological advances. Reducing your fear of change is important and will give you more confidence.

Older learners can take part in general adult education classes at all levels – on vocational and non-vocational topics – as well as in sessions designed to meet the needs of a specific learning group. Some thrive among students of other generations, and would resist ‘Segregation’. For others, learning with their peers can promote confidence.

AGE UK, the charity for older people, is working with a network of community projects across the country, to provide training for computer and technology for baby boomers and older people. A great feature is a determination to avoid jargon and explaining things clearly in plain English. The websites of the BBC and the charity go-on.co.uk both provide resources for beginners to learn about computers, the internet, and digital technology.

Go-on.co.uk is a new cross-sector partnership that aims to make the UK the most digitally-capable nation in the world, and bring the benefits of the internet to every individual and every organisation in every community across the UK.

The government-backed UK Online also has 6,000 centres around the UK providing access to and advice on computers and the internet, and most local authorities offer computers and training events at their libraries.

My name is David Kinghorn and I have just retired, I am what is known as a baby boomer and my aim is to help other baby boomers enjoy their retirement, for more information go to; http://www.retirementplanning4babyboomers.com

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